From Our Blog

Financial Literacy Provides a Way Out for Abuse Survivors

19.September.14

Trigger Warning: This piece includes references to domestic violence and other forms of abuse. One in four women will experience domestic abuse in her lifetime. Abuse comes in many forms, but one more subtle but still damaging form that many women face is financial abuse. Financial abuse occurs when an abuser forcibly controls another person’s money Read More >>

Erick Heurta: My Story

18.September.14

By: Erick Huerta When you grow up in neighborhoods like East Los Angeles and South Central, you find yourself at a disadvantage, so you cultivate other things to make up for it. You go out into a world that is institutionally stacked against you in all aspects of your life and you make the best Read More >>

We Can’t Survive on $7.25

11.September.14

This piece originally appeared on TalkPoverty.org. At 6 a.m. last Thursday, a small group of people gathered at the Burger King on the corner of North Avenue and Hunt Street in Atlanta’s Old Fourth Ward. They were fast food workers, home care workers, and those who support their cause. By the time the sun came up Read More >>

Reflection on Ferguson, Missouri

5.September.14

Field Organizer Tammy Thomas-Miles went to Ferguson, Missouri over the Labor Day weekend as part of a strategy session with other organizers. Here is Tammy’s first person account of the trip. It took me 18 hours to get to Ferguson, Missouri from Florida in a van packed with young people and we did not know Read More >>

Introducing Our New Writing Fellows!

27.August.14

For the past two months, Laffon Brelland Jr., Tamika Middleton and Elois Freeman have been participating in a Writing Fellowship pilot program at the Center for Community Change. In order to get the word out there about the true life experiences of the people who are struggling to get by in this economy, our Writing Read More >>

When Enough Gets to Be Enough

20.August.14

This blog was originally posted on the Voices for Human Needs blog.  On Monday night, thousands of people marched through downtown Atlanta in the pouring rain.  Most of them I had never seen. The march was multiracial (though mostly Black) and multigenerational (though mostly collegestudents). Protesters wore suits and dresses, caps and gowns, shorts and sneakers. Many Read More >>